Patrons: update your address

If you are a Patreon supporter of my comic series Incredible Doom update your address, because the slipcase for season one and the patron exclusive Issue # 0, featuring 70 pages of exclusive Incredible Doom comics, are about to go in the mail.

Both Patreon exclusive items have been in the works for years, and I’m proud of how they turned out.

If you’re not a baker and you’d like them, sign up quickly!

How to turn your books into time capsules – Austin Kleon

Years ago I borrowed this copy of Italo Calvino’s If On A Winter’s Night A Traveler from my father-in-law, and when I opened it up I found Calvino’s 1985 NYTimes obit and stories from a 1983 Harper’s.I was so surprised and delighted by these unexpected artifacts that I decided to start saving clippings in my own books.

via How to turn your books into time capsules – Austin Kleon

I love this idea. Even better is that issues of Incredible Doom come with artifacts of their own right from the start.

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I’m not sure I should have quit my day job.

Two weeks ago, I returned home from visiting family in Canada. They’d given me a check for inheritance my aunt had left me.

On the ferry ride back to the states I talked with my girlfriend, and we both decided I should put in my two weeks at my day job, the store I’d been at for the last nine years, take a portion of the money and try to draw comics full time. Take six months to dedicate to comics. See what happens.

 

I’d been thinking of leaving that job for years, but I‘d been dreaming of doing comics full time all my life.

When I left for Canada three weeks ago, I had no concrete plans to quit, yet yesterday was my last day at that job.

 I’m thrilled, overwhelmed, and frightened about what I’ve done.

Guess I better go make comics.

Giving Up – Why “Oh, It’s the End of the World” is on hiatus.

Recently, I was toying with the idea of giving up comics.

When I was making comics in middle school it was all about coming up with the most bad ass costume design (more spikes!). In high school it became about trying to write the most gritty dialogue. Later it was all about pacing or figuring out the beats of a scene.

For the last two years it’s been all about guilt and shame.

“Oh, It’s the End of the World” the comic I’d been working on had become a horrible chore. I could tell there was still another year of work I had to do on the book before it would be finished, but I’d lost faith in my ability to make the climax engaging. The story went off in to areas I now wish it hadn’t, and didn’t get to places it needed to in order for the planned ending to fly. I battled this with rewrites, new middle chapters, and lots and lots of guilt about missed update schedules, bloating chapters, and imagining disappointed readers.

I don’t think it’s a lost cause. With some time away and reworking I think it could be shaped into something I’m really proud of. But I spent a long time convinced that the best way to get out of the hole was to keep digging, and that’s crazy.

So about two months ago, quietly, “Oh, It’s the End of the World” went on hiatus, and let -me – tell – you, it’s such a good thing!

“I’d toyed with the idea of giving up comics.”

Even writing that sentence just now seems ridiculous. Giving up comics? What? I’ve been publishing comics since I was in elementary school! As long as I’m medically able to, chances are I’ll do another comic.

Case in point, I’m working on a new project that I plan to publish this year. Oh wow it feels exciting to write that. There’s a ghost in it. It’s awesome. That’s all I’ll say about it now.

I’m writing this to acknowledge that this shit can get really hard, to say that I’m still here. I’m once again excited to be here, thank you for still being here as well.

I can’t wait for you to see what I’ve got up my sleeve!

The Setup / Matthew Bogart

For those of you interested in the tools people use, I was interviewed on a site that I’ve read and enjoyed for years: The Setup.

I talk aobut the techology I use to write and draw comics as well as why I work the way I do. 

For those of you interested in the tools people use, I was interviewed on a site that I’ve read and enjoyed for years: The Setup.

I talk about the technology I use to write and draw comics as well as why I work the way I do.

Writing in public.

 

As I work on the comics I get to do as part of my Kickstarter rewards, I’ve been posting parts of my process to backers of my Patreon.

Last week I recorded a short video about how I approach writing comics, and this week I just decided to do the scarryest bit of creative sharing I’ve done so far: I’ve published a link to the script of my next comic that updates live as I write it.

It includes spelling mistakes, sentence fragments that only make sense to me, and ideas I haven’t realized are terrible yet. I have no idea if it will change a lot or a little as I start to layout the actual pages of the story, but if you’d like see a script like this evolve over time this is as good as looking over my shoulder.

Why share this kind of thing?

As I work on the comics I get to do as part of my Kickstarter rewards, I’ve been posting parts of my process to backers of my Patreon.

Last week I recorded a short video about how I approach writing comics, and this week I just decided to do the scariest bit of creative sharing I’ve done so far: I’ve published a link to the script of my next comic that updates live as I write it.

It includes spelling mistakes, sentence fragments that only make sense to me, and ideas I haven’t realized are terrible yet. I have no idea if it will change a lot or a little as I start to layout the actual pages of the story, but if you’d like see a script like this evolve over time this is as good as looking over my shoulder.

Why share this kind of thing?

I’m a big believer in demystifying the creative process. Many people have the impression that folks who make things are blessed with some sort of magic quality that others simply don’t have. Hopefully, sharing the worst, most unpolished bits of my creative process can help people realize that everything starts out bad. After all:

“On the spectrum of creative work, the difference between the mediocre and the good is vast. Mediocrity is, however still on the spectrum; you can move from mediocre to good in increments. The real It’s between doing nothing in doing something.” from “Cognitive Surplus” by Clay Shirky

Of course it’s also possible that all this will serve to do is make my Patreon backers realize that I’m horrible at this and go back a cartoonist who knows what they are doing.

Anyway, I’m not putting my comics online to become famous or change the world. I’m here to make friends, and by letting go of our egos and sharing our process, we allow for the possibility of more people making more cool things and establishing a deeper ongoing connection with us and our work.

That said:

 Spoilery says Look Out! Spoilery says Look Out!

Of course, this comes with the ultimate spoiler warning. It’s possibly the worst way on earth to read a comic. Not only will you know what’s going to happen in the comic before it’s done, you get to have the added frustration of discovering that your least favorite bits make it through every script revision, and your favorite line is going to get edited out at the last second.

Sometimes it’s best not to know how the sausage is made.

BUT, if it helps you out or you find it interesting, here’s where you can become a backer and read it. It’s pretty short right now, but I’ll be adding to it and changing it over the next little while.

I’m doing it for backers only at the moment, mostly because I’m terrified of sharing it with the whole internet. But if you’re dirt poor and can’t afford the $3 send me an email and I’ll send you the link.